Young, Obese Men May Not Make It to Middle Age !

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Obese youngsters beware! Men who turn obese in their early twenties are significantly less likely to live to reach middle age than their slim peers, a new study has claimed.

Men who are obese in their early twenties are significantly less likely to live to reach middle age, according to a new study published in the BMJ.

They are also up to eight times more likely to suffer diabetes, potentially fatal blood clots or a heart attack.It is well known that obesity in adulthood poses a risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but previously it had not been clear whether obesity in early adulthood strengthens that risk.

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Almost half of those classified as obese at the age of 22 were diagnosed with diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, blood clots in the legs or lungs, or had died before reaching the age of 55.

They were eight times as likely to get diabetes as their normal weight peers and four times as likely to get a potentially fatal blood clot (venous thromboembolism). They were also more than twice as likely to develop high blood pressure, have had a heart attack, or to have died.Every unit increase in BMI corresponded to an increased heart attack rate of 5%, high blood pressure and blood clot rates of 10%, and an increased diabetes rate of 20%.

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In all, obese young men were three times as likely to get any of these serious conditions as their normal weight peers by middle age, conferring an absolute risk of almost 50% compared with only 20% among their normal weight peers.The findings prompt the authors to warn that the continuing rise in obesity may counteract the fall in deaths from heart disease.

Obese young men were three times as likely to get any of these serious conditions as their normal weight peers by middle age, conferring an absolute risk of almost 50 per cent compared with only 20 per cent among their normal weight peers.

“Obesity related morbidity and mortality will, in decades to come, place an unprecedented burden on healthcare systems worldwide,” researchers suggest.

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According to the researchers, almost half of those considered obese at the age of 22 were diagnosed with life threatening disorders like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, or blood clots in legs or lungs by the time they reached 55 – or they didn’t make it to 55 at all.

The obese participants were eight times more likely to get diabetes, four times more likely to have a fatal blood clot – also known as venous thromboembolism – and more than twice as likely to have high blood pressure, have sustained a heart attack or to have died.

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“In all, obese young men were three times as likely to get any of these serious conditions as their normal weight peers by middle age, conferring an absolute risk of almost 50 percent compared with only 20 percent among their normal weight peers,” Schmidt said.

While Schmidt and his colleagues only tested men, they said it’s just as likely the correlation translates to women as well.

“Previous reports have shown that young adulthood obesity also increases the risk for premature death among women,” Schmidt said, “so we have no reason not to suspect that these findings also hold true for women.”

A group of young, overweight men were found to be 30 percent more likely to die before or during middle age than those of normal weight, and nearly half developed serious health conditions before age 55, according to the study.

Researchers from Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark followed 6,500 men for 33 years, starting when they were between the ages of 22 and 33. The men who were obese in their twenties and early thirties fared far worse than men of normal weight, researchers said.

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“We found that nearly half of all obese young men either were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke or venous thromboembolism or died before reaching 55 years of age,” researchers wrote in the study.

Overall, men who were obese when the study began were 30 percent more likely to die before reaching middle age than men who were not obese, researchers said. They attributed the increased risk of death to the onset of serious health problems.

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